Giving-is-an-act-of-worship

Giving is an act of worship

The offering is collected as part of the worship service because giving is an act of worship.

The church member is not paying the price of admission or paying our dues. We are offering something to God as an expression of our adoration and praise We are dedicating our wealth to God by giving back the portion God commands to be given back. Psalm 96:8 says, “Praise the Lord for the glory that belongs to him. Bring an offering and come into the courtyards of his temple.”

Bringing an offering is one of the best ways to express our devotion to God. It is something you do, not just something you say. It’s the walk that backs up your walk. When we bring in our offering, God is not only glorified but we are also blessed in the process. It’s already a blessing to participate in God’s work, but to actually receive material blessings because of our giving is truly out of God’s abundant love for us.

If you think about it, everything we have belongs to God already, and He would be well within his rights to take it back. Instead, God allows us to offer it to him as an act of worship. Imagine a father who gives his children money to buy him a birthday present. The kids are delighted to do this for this father because they love him.

When he opens the gift, he is getting back his own money’s worth. But the giving of the gift is significant for the father-child bond. It’s like that with God. and not about the money or where it came from—it’s about the love that the children express for their father.

It’s not about the money or where it came from—it’s about the love that the children express for their father.

God is the same with us. If He wanted to, God could have performed a miracle and simply built the tabernacle before the people’s eyes. Why did He have to instruct them through the processing of collecting an offering, and building? God wanted to build a relationship with His children. He wanted to go through this messy, teaching process so that the children can know their Father’s heart.

God gave the Israelites an opportunity to contribute to its construction. Throughout the bible and human history, this is how God usually works: He gives people an opportunity to participate. Although people can never repay Him, believers can offer themselves for His service.

All of the things that the Israelites brought were things that they already received from God. They brought gold, silver, and precious gems from the plunder that God provided from the Egyptians. It was God’s grace that the Egyptians even agreed to give them these treasures.

Worship:

35 They did just as Moses had directed them. They asked the Egyptians for things made out of silver and gold. They also asked them for clothes. 

36 The Lord had caused the Egyptians to treat the Israelites in a kind way. So the Egyptians gave them what they asked for. The Israelites took many expensive things that belonged to the Egyptians. (Exodus 12:35-36, emphasis added by author)

Aside from this, the Israelites brought wood from trees that God caused to grow from the land. They brought cloth that came from animals God put in their flocks. There was nothing Israelites could bring that did not come from God, to begin with.  God is the Ultimate Cause, and they were brought in everything that God caused to exist.

The Israelites are a nation of slaves, a people without money or power. Like us, unless God gave them something to bring, they would have nothing to offer. They would be incapable of bringing in an offering.  But out of the riches of his grace, he provided something for them to give. Some people withhold the offering that God already gave them the capacity to bring in. God has given us the resources to respond to His grace. Whenever we bring an offering, we are simply giving back a portion of what He has already given to us.

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

Giving-is-an-act-of-worship

Raise as a Contribution So I Can Dwell Among Them

Raise as a Contribution So I Can Dwell Among Them

Raise as a Contribution So I Can Dwell Among Them:

The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see.

-G.K. Chesterton

“Your happiest while you’re making the greatest contribution.”

-Robert F. Kennedy

Each of you must give as you have made up your mind, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.

2 Corinthians 9:7 NRSV

 

A worship service in ancient Israel

In Exodus 24, God confirmed his covenant with Israel in a public worship service. This ancient worship service is similar to what we experience. It’s a call to worship, a confession of faith, a reading from God’s Word, and a celebration of communion.  It was all done in the glorious presence of the Lord on the basis of a blood covenant. Even by this day’s standard, it was a complete worship service.

The only thing the assembly did not do was take it upon offer. However, this is to be rectified in chapter 25. Moses went up the mountain again, as he waited for six days for God’s next instruction on what to do next. On the seventh day, the prophet was allowed to enter the glory of God.

The first thing God said was to take up an offering for the tabernacle. They were to set up a Holy Sanctuary so that God may dwell with His people.

Just like when we have a building project for our church, and we take up a special offering for it, the Lord commanded Israelites to take up an offering specifically to build him a sanctuary. The people were to fund the building of a sanctuary so that He can dwell among us.

Giving and Commitment

Giving to God is a significant sign of our commitment to Christ. Our willingness to give back some of what we own is a strong indicator of spiritual health. A Christian who is not giving is probably not growing. Stewardship helps a Christian grows. When a Christian is giving to the Lord, then he is exhibiting stewardship. A lot of Christians are embarrassed or timid to talk about money. They view their finances to be a private matter, and it’s none of the church’s business.

A person who wants to hear the Word would hear a sermon on giving because finances is an important biblical theme. More than 400 Bible passages talk specifically about money, and a lot more than covers principles for Christian stewardship. Exodus 25 is one of those passages. The instructions God gave a talk about the Christian’s duty to give our best to God — from each of our hearts — for his holy work.

 

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

Raise as a Contribution So I Can Dwell Among Them

Deuteronomy.

DEUTERONOMY 12:11-12

The next chapter talks about the importance of bringing in the offerings that the Lord prescribed, where He commanded it to be brought, and how the people would be filled with joy, as a result. In Deuteronomy,  God places His name in the place He commands people to bring their offering to.

11 The Lord your God will choose a special place. He will put his Name there. That’s where you must bring everything I command you to bring. That includes your burnt offerings and sacrifices. It includes your special gifts and a tenth of everything you produce. It also includes all the things of value that you promised to give to the Lord.

12 Be filled with joy there in the sight of the Lord your God. Your children should also be joyful. So should your male and female servants. And so should the Levites from your towns. The Levites won’t receive any part of the land as their share. (Deuteronomy 12:11-12)

Correct worship brings a joy the world cannot replicate. Worship is for everyone. The Levite is especially noted because he is not given a place of inheritance like others, but he must still worship in the place God designated.

 

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

TARUMAH

TÂRUMAH AS A SACRIFICE

The heave-offering or the târumah offering is found in the Old Testament. Practicing the giving of the târumah is a spiritual exercise that trains our hearts and minds to keep an altar for the Lord. We are to set apart the târumah offering and to give it generously. The Lord is a holy God and this practice is our declaration of our obedience and trust in the Lord.

Numbers 5:9

According to Numbers 5:9, “All the sacred gifts the Israelites bring to a priest will belong to him.”  Exodus 23:19 tells us, “The choice first fruits of your soil you shall bring to the house of the Lord your God.” The heave-offering belongs to the priest.

In Numbers 5:9, the term “gifts” here is directly translated as the târumah.

Gifts are made “sacred,” not because one brings them to the priest. Instead, the gift is sacred because the giver sets it apart from his income.

Gifts are made “sacred,” not because one brings them to the priest. Instead, the gift is sacred because the giver sets it apart from his income. The first fruits of the income are set apart as tithes and offerings, as well as târumah or heave offering. The act of separating the first fruits makes the entire income holy because the giver is declaring that God is the source of the entire provision. Even when the giver is sacrificing only a portion of the income, the Lord can bless the whole lot, depending on the attitude of the giver’s heart.

Deuteronomy 12:6: In the passage below, we see that the târumah or the “special gifts” is different from the tithe.

The passage said bring your special gifts and a tenth of everything you produce. If it were the same, it would have said special gifts or a tenth of everything you produce. Thus, they are different offerings that are commanded of the people.

Take your burnt offerings and sacrifices to that place. Bring your special gifts and a tenth of everything you produce. Take with you what you have promised to give. Bring any other offerings you choose to give. And bring the male animals among your livestock that were born first to their mothers. (Deuteronomy 12:6, emphasis added)

Where you are right now, if you have peace in your heart about the local church you belong to, then this is the place God chose you to worship, and you must bring the offering here.

Different kinds of offerings are brought to God’s chosen place of worship. The Lord specifically guides the believers as to where they are to bring the offering. Where you are right now, if you have peace in your heart about the local church you belong to, then this is the place God chose you to worship, and you must bring the offering here. The people are called to sacrifice and to offer it unto the Lord as worship.

Deuteronomy 12:6 is followed by verse 7, which is a verse that speaks of joy:

You and your families will eat at the place the Lord your God will choose. He will be with you there. You will find joy in everything you have done. That’s because he has blessed you. (Deuteronomy 12:7)

Giving results in joy, not in sorrow, in the Christian life.

Out of the people’s obedience, there is a joy as a result of blessings. Joy is underlined by the fact that it appeared twice in the chapter accompanying sacrifices and offerings (Dt. 12:12; 18). Giving results in joy, not in sorrow, in the Christian life. We go back to how Paul related generosity with an attitude of cheerfulness:

Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give. You shouldn’t give if you don’t want to. You shouldn’t give because you are forced to. God loves a cheerful giver. (2 Corinthians 9:7)

As a people, may we find joy in giving? Our offering to the Lord is not another bill to pay. It is an opportunity to express our true devotion to the Lord. It is a declaration that we treasure our relationship with God more than we treasure our earthly wealth. Moreover, it is an opportunity to experience the blessings and faithfulness of the Lord, as a direct outcome of our obedience.

There is joy when you experience the communal nature of worship life with a local church. It is important to rediscover the joy of community worship, making offerings to the Lord as God’s people. It’s one thing to be called to give individually, but to live together as a church is a whole different experience of communal worship. The early church love feasts. It is after they give their offerings as a community that they also have celebrations as a community.

It’s one thing to be called to give individually, but to live together as a church is a whole different experience of communal worship.

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

TARUMAH

LESSONS FROM OLD TESTAMENT SACRIFICES

LESSONS FROM OLD TESTAMENT SACRIFICES:

In the Old Testament, when you read through the list of acceptable sacrifices, you should feel grateful that you don’t need to live that way. However, we must take note of how specific God was in giving instructions that dictated true worship. Every sacrifice had a purpose, a method, and a particular application. One sacrifice cannot double for another. Each is separate and individual. Each required a perfect sacrifice — best, without blemish, and carried a cost for the person making the offering. Primarily, we need to grasp that people considered the sacrifice as an investment for the true worshipper; it had a cost to be paid and it required commitment.

Primarily, we need to grasp that people considered the testament sacrifice as an investment for the true worshipper; it had a cost to be paid and it required commitment.

It is true that Jesus is the one-and-only perfect sacrifice. However, if we say Christians must not sacrifice at all, then where does Lordship come in. It is natural that sacrifice is involved because as sinners were are the little lords of our lives. When we say Jesus is Lord and live out this truth, then that in itself is a life of sacrifice.

Presumptive Worship is Not Genuine Worship

It is dangerous to assume that a sense of entitlement because of our relationship with God. We were created for His glory. Presumptive worship is when we expect from God without first giving what He requires. When we do this, we literally take the name of the Lord in vain. It’s a mockery of God’s holiness. We cannot claim something we have no right to use.

Presumptive worship is when we expect from God without first giving what He requires.

If we are unable to sacrifice because we give the excuse of grace, then we are making a mockery of God’s grace. Grace empowers us to worship. God is holy, first and foremost, and He is to be worshipped. He will never allow Himself to be mocked. We must honor His name by making sure that the altars of our lives always contain a sacrifice to the Lord. God would never write His name on an altar of self-gratification.

 

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

TESTAMENT

THE-ALTAR-AND-TRUE-WORSHIP

THE ALTAR AND TRUE WORSHIP

From the very beginning, the altar is a prominent figure in the Old Testament.  An altar is a dedicated place of worship. The first altar ever built signified the growth of God’s relationship with His people. It moves from a simple earthen altar by Abel through Abraham and the more detailed structure that the Israelites structured after the Exodus. Prophets like Elijah raised altars to God. Altars may have varied in look and structure, but the features of worship remain true even today.

The altar was intended to be pure and set aside for worship. The altar never doubled for some other practice object in daily life.

One feature of the altar is it was raised in obedience to the commands of God. They represented a commitment to worship Him according to His prescribed order. They are actually allowing God to tell them how He wants them to worship Him. People never added any décor or embellishment that God did not prescribe. God instructed that the altar contain no man-conceived marking or shape. The altar never doubled for some other practice object in daily life. It’s one purpose is to be a place of worship.

In the New Testament, the altar of God remained the center of worship.

God still requires His altar to be kept pure, holy and set apart for Him. Unless we follow these commands, we cannot claim true worship. The difference is in the New Testament, the altar has nothing to do with physical altars. Grace has done away with a physical altar, but not the principles it embodies. The finite mind of the person needs physical representations of abstract truths. Thus, in order for us to truly understand how we are to set up altars in the modern-day, we must understand the principles, purpose, and reverence people had for altars in ancient times.

Because of the abstract nature of altar-building in the New Testament, as we cannot literally take out our hearts and offer it to God, we tend to disregard the true essence of worship and sacrifice.

The New Testament altar is the person because the Bible said we erect an altar for the Lord in our hearts. Each of us is required to raise up an altar to the Lord. We give Him our hearts, we raise up a temple. Because of the abstract nature of altar-building in the New Testament, as we cannot literally take out our hearts and offer it to God, we tend to disregard the true essence of worship and sacrifice.

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan 

THE-ALTAR-AND-TRUE-WORSHIP

Sacrifice-as-Worship

Sacrifice as Worship

“Sometimes when you sacrifice something precious, you’re not really losing it. You’re just passing it on to someone else.”

Mitch Albom

Through him, then, let us continually offer a sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of lips that confess his name.

Hebrews 13:15 NRSV

True worship requires sacrifice

God’s grace allows us to have an intimate experience with Him. A lot of people spend eternity without having to realize and be in the presence of the God of the Universe. However, a lot of this intimacy is conditional and comes as a reward of obedience. A lot of people choose the good things but are unwilling to participate when there is already a cost. There are blessings and promises that require an altar and a sacrifice. There are things we need to consecrate and set apart for the Lord.

24 An altar of earth thou shalt make unto me and shalt sacrifice thereon thy burnt offerings, and thy peace offerings, thy sheep, and thine oxen: in all places where I record my name I will come unto thee, and I will bless thee. (Exodus 20:24)

Living as a New Testament people of God, we are not required to follow Old Testament Law in terms of actual altars and sacrifices, but they are there to teach us a mindset. The Old Testament instructions on worship and offering happen when our hearts are surrendered to the Lord. Oftentimes, we miss out on the truths of worship completely.

Too many believers neglect Old Testament worship regarding it as the past, and the New Testament as the present. On some level, it is true that we are redeemed from the Law by Jesus. However, the Old Testament is still significant and relevant to our spiritual walks. The whole Bible is the standard, not just the portions we chose from it. Everything in the Bible adds detail, example, and even practical principles in understanding how God interacts with His people.

We cannot write off the faith and principles of Old Testament practice to be archaic and irrelevant.

Grace does mark the new covenant. However, without an understanding of the truths in the Old Testament worship, we cannot fully grasp or live in absolute grace by learning about true worship.  We cannot be extremes in such that we sacrifice actual animals on altars. However, we cannot write off the faith and principles of Old Testament practice to be archaic and irrelevant.

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

Sacrifice-as-Worship

 

THE SPIRIT OF TZEDAKAH

THE SPIRIT OF TZEDAKAH

A Spiritual Transaction for the spirit of tzedakah:

Tzedakah, as with every other giving that the Lord calls us to do is a spiritual exercise.

Tzedakah, as with every other giving that the Lord calls us to do is a spiritual exercise. We seem to forget that the Lord God does not need our money. Nevertheless, we are commanded to give in order to foster empathy, compassion, and generosity. We are being molded to be more like Jesus. It is through giving of ourselves that we actually become more. Giving a part of what we hold dear leads to a more meaningful life.

A rabbi once asked, “What is better? Giving 1000 gold pieces to one person, or giving one gold piece to 1000 people? According to him, the latter is better. How come? It is because each act of generosity is separate.

If your performance a generous act 1000 times, it means you chose to give 1000 times. It’s like the number of repetitions you do in the gym. The more repetitions you do, you more you grow stronger.

The essence of tzedakah isn’t a financial transaction; it is spiritual.  It grows you spiritually — and as God promised when you seek Him first, it can also grow you financially (Mt. 6:33).

The pretzel lady had the chutzpah to tell the young man that the price of the pretzel has gone up, and therefore the price of his tzedakah has gone up too. In reality, the cost of living gene

 

rally rises. It makes perfect sense for the pretzel lady to say what she did. As givers, we must always reevaluate if what we are giving is truly contributing to the welfare of others.

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing aw

 

aits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

 

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

chutzpah

Chutzpah “How To GIVE”

Chutzpah “How To GIVE”

Chutzpah is a Yiddish term meaning “gall, brazen nerve, effrontery, sheer guts plus arrogance. English words cannot do real justice to this word. Instead, here’s a story that allows us to understand this word to use its message in our giving.

A little old lady sold pretzels on a street corner for 25 cents each. Every day a young man would leave his office building at lunchtime and as he passed the pretzel stand he would leave her a quarter, but never take a pretzel.
And this went on for more than three years. The two of them never spoke. One day as the young man passed the old lady’s stand and left his quarter as usual, the pretzel lady spoke to him. Without blinking an eye she said: “They’re 35 cents now.”

With present-day Christians who are supposed to have an encounter with Jesus Christ, generosity is such a struggle.

This story captures one definition of chutzpah, but because it also how generosity and duty are so intertwined with each other and deeply ingrained in the Jewish culture. With present-day Christians who are supposed to have an encounter with Jesus Christ, generosity is such a struggle.

When giving the tzedakah, it is essential that the recipient is not shamed in any way.  The best form of giving is when the identity of the donor is unknown. In ancient Israel, there were schemes that were invented to keep the anonymity of the donation.

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

SOCIAL JUSTICE

SOCIAL JUSTICE

The Bible has repeatedly stressed the obligation of the believer to aid those who are in need.

SOCIAL JUSTICE: The Bible has repeatedly stressed the obligation of the believer to aid those who are in need. The purpose why the Lord provides for us is for personal sustenance, and to help others who need it. When we only use our income for personal gain, then we are moving into social injustice. We are not doing our part to contribute to society. Even when the bible stressed this obligation to help the less fortunate, there is no specific term for it.

Tzedakah is something the Rabbis adopted to apply to charity, in the context of social justice.

Tzedakah’s literal meaning is “righteousness” or “justice,” as in the famous biblical phrase, “Tzedek, Tzedek, tirdof” (“Justice, justice, shall you pursue”; Deut. 16:20). Charity is not merely a generous or magnanimous act.

For the Israelites, giving is the performance of a religiously mandated duty to provide something to which the needy have a right. By providing the chance to carry out an important mitzvah, the poor man gives the giver more in accepting the alms, than the giver does for the poor man in giving him charity. How come? The poor man allows the giver to be blessed a hundredfold.

The blessings come according to the individual’s obedience to God’s divine laws and commands.

God determines who He is going to bless with wealth and who is going to be poor. He is the ultimate owner of all human possessions. The blessings come according to the individual’s obedience to God’s divine laws and commands. Understandably, the one who has faith in the Lord would obey, and be blessed. On the other hand, the one who doubts the Word of God would ignore His commands and would find himself in lack. A person who believes in the Lord should be willing to give whatever he or she has to fulfill the divine will of the Lord.

Leaning towards social justice:

There is a need to consider the Jewish view of charity. Christians focus on charity as motivated by the love for fellow human beings. The Jewish view is more realistic and leaning towards social justice. They believe in giving to those who need help and doing it because it is right — as they have the resources and they have the need.

It does not mean that Jewish ethics have no concept of love or philanthropy. Instead, they believe in going above the requirements of the law, as an act of lovingkindness. As in the last chapter, there are different kinds of givers. Aspire to be the generous giver and set apart a portion of what God has given to you to bless others.

A Divine Attribute

Having the tzedakah spirit, or a philanthropic spirit is a divine attribute since God upholds the cause of the fatherless and the widows (Deut. 10:18). If God does so, then the one who gives to those who need it partners with the Lord. Giving to the poor is regarded as an essential element of the righteous life. It is not enough to simply fast and do your devotions. What good is that if there is no fruit?

Action must back up your faith. Action reveals the faith of the person.

The prophet Isaiah castigated those who fast and do nothing afterward. He is telling the believers to fast and share their bread with the hungry or take the poor into your home. Action must back up your faith. Action reveals the faith of the person.

The Prophet Ezekiel (16:49) prophesied about the destruction of Sodom because of its lack of charity: they “had pride, excess of food, and prosperous ease, but did not aid the poor and needy.” King Solomon talked about the noble wife giving generously to the poor, her hands being stretched out to help the need (Prov. 31:20).

Here’s another passage that is interesting, “Whoever is kind to the poor lends to the Lord, and will be repaid in full” (Prov. 19:17). How amazing is this Word? When you are generous, it is the Lord whom you are lending to, and it is also the Lord who would pay you back in full. King Solomon also wrote to do what is right (tzedakah) is more desired by the Lord than sacrifice (Prov. 21;3). The Lord values the one who goes beyond what the Law says.

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

SOCIAL JUSTICE

Tzedakah

The Tzedakah Spirit

“The opposite of love is not hate, it’s indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it’s indifference. And, the opposite of life is not death, it’s indifference. Because of indifference once dies before one actually dies.”

Elie Wiesel

May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Romans 15:13 NRSV

The distinction of Tzedakah (צְדָקָה)

There is a different kind of giving that emerges from the bible. Târumah can be considered tzedakah, especially when it is in the context of taking care of your leaders — people whose duty does not allow them to make a profit for themselves.

The word tzedakah (tsuh-DOCK-ah) is a Hebrew term that literally means “righteousness”. In the Jewish culture, tzedakah pertains to charitable giving or philanthropy. In Judaism, the weight of this word goes beyond charity. It refers to doing good to ensure that the needs of others are met.

In the context of the târumah, the giver does not only give to fulfill traditions or duties. Instead, there is a spirit that has compassion for the well-being of the priests, as servants of God. They are doing their part to serve their spiritual leaders. The tzedakah offering does not only include the târumah, but it refers to what we now know as a benevolence fund.

Tzedakah is a foundational spiritual practice. Tzedakah was a central obligation of Jewish life, whether the person is rich or poor.

The practice of giving is not according to a person’s economic station or spiritual accomplishments. In the Jewish culture, life begins and ends in tzedakah, and so it must not be an issue or a struggle. When a child is born, the Jewish father pledges a certain amount of money for the distribution of the poor. At the funeral, the mourners contribute coins to the beggars who swarm the burial area.

The tzedakah is practiced in order to remind the individual that at every turn of one’s life, giving is present. Every celebration or holiday is usually accompanied by gifts. In Jewish culture, generosity is a way of life. During holidays, they would pass around a box wherein coins are dropped for the support of different charities.

The well-off home has a series of boxes for different purposes. If something good or bad happens to the family, a coin is dropped in the box. The children are also trained in the habit of giving.

The father would encourage this habit by having his son give the alms to the beggar, instead of handing them over directly. Jewish people grow up with the gesture of giving becoming almost a reflex. How blessed is a person whose habit is to give, instead of to take?

Jewish people grow up with the gesture of giving becoming almost a reflex.

If we study the proper context of “love your neighbor as yourself” (Lev.19:18), it is not a command to feel as loving toward another as you do toward yourself, but to love your neighbor as part of yourself. Love is an action. It is about taking care of others, as you do yourself. Thus, giving tzedakah leads to the realization that there is no self or other —  giving to the needy is like taking money from your right hand and placing it into your left.

Tzedakah is a practice in which anyone can engage. Unlike the word “charity,” which has its origins in the Latin Caritas, “heart,” tzedakah comes from the Hebrew word tzedek, which means “justice.”

Charity is done by someone whose heart is awakened (Ruach), something not everyone has experienced.

Tzedakah, on the other hand, challenges you to be just. Even the person who has a scarcity-fearing egoic consciousness (Neshamah) can support this principle, since creating a system of just earning and use of finances protects you as well as others.
According to Moses Maimonides, a great medieval philosopher, there are eight degrees of tzedakah (with number 1 being the ultimate and number 8 being the most basic) still followed today:
  1. Seeing to a person’s independence by providing a person with a job, entering into a partnership that allows the person to establish a business, giving an interest-free loan, giving a grant.
  2. Giving tzedakah anonymously through a reputable third party and without knowing who will receive the aid.
  3. Displaying anonymously to a known recipient.
  4. Showing publically to an unknown recipient.
  5. Offering without being asked.
  6. Allowing generously after being asked.
  7. Awarding gladly but not generously.
  8. Giving grudgingly.

The highest form of charity is when you prevent others from ever becoming poor, such as by offering a loan or employment or investing in someone’s business.

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan 

Tzedakah

GIVERS

THE THREE KINDS OF GIVERS

THE THREE KINDS OF GIVERS:  In the Rabbinic tradition, the proportion by which a person gives reveals the person’s heart. The generous man — the man with a good eye — gives 1/40 of his income to the priest. In other words, he gives 2.5% to the priest, on top of the 10% he gives as his tithe.

If the income of this generous man is $10,000, then $1000 is given back as his tithe, and $250 is given to the priest as a heave-offering.

The fair man gives back 1/50 or 2% portion of his income outside of the tithe. Whoever gives 1/60 or below above the tithe is referred to as a stingy man or the miserly. In other words, someone who gives 1.6% or less of his income, outside of the tithe is considered tightfisted.

The generous man — the man with a good eye — gives 1/40 of his income to the priest.

The Târumah Offering Principle No. 11

A         [This is] the [required] measure of heave offering:

B         [If a man is] generous, [he separates] one-fortieth [of his produce].

C         The House of Shammai say, “One-thirtieth.”

D         And [if he is] average, [he separates] one-fiftieth [of his produce].

E         And [if he is] miserly, [he separates] one-sixtieth [of his produce]

A blessing is declared upon the entire increase by separating the târumah from the rest of the income.

The Târumah is producing that is separated from the harvest and given to the priest as a gift, and it is a personal thing for the giver. A blessing is declared upon the entire increase by separating the târumah from the rest of the income. Ideally, the person reciting the blessing must be able to hear himself say it.

Once it is separated the târumah is consumed by the priest and their families alone, and this food could not revert to the status of Hullin, or the food that is consumed by non-ministers.

Your weekly dose of prophetic wisdom and anointing awaits you. Join our LIVE Conference Call!

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

GIVERS