THE DECLINE OF SOCIAL CHRISTIANITY

Today, the Church is no longer consciously concerned with many social issues; instead, it has shifted its focus towards politically motivated issues. This is because a revival is necessary if Christianity is to make itself relevant in the war with culture over the direction of the world’s social ethic. For one thing, apathy is rampant in the church pews, hence the countless quantities of people attending church services to merely go through the motions as if trying to earn their perfect attendance token in exchange for eternal life. Instead of expressing concern for various social issues such as housing the poor, caring for the lonely, and feeding the hungry, many Christians have undergone a paradigm shift; they are now solely concerned with their atomist individualist relationship with God. This is a festering cancer presently dormant within the body of Christ. As a cancer, it must be removed through a revival in caring for others as we care about ourselves. Jesus, need we be reminded, was never apathetic.

Christians everywhere need to go back in time and, to phrase it imply, “care” about stuff. Certain matters have taken the spotlight in the place of social issues. Therefore, it is fair to say that the Church’s attention is spread among these issues and not solely on the social aspect of Christ’s gospel. What has become evident now are these: an obsession over the avoidance of particular sins, spotless church attendance and issues of inter-communion (e.g. Catholics and Protestants conflicting each other in social matters)—and these have taken more meaning than feeding the poor or loving the lonely. These practices do not support the idea that being a disciple of Christ is about serving others and being willing to lay one’s own life down for one’s enemy, or even a stranger. When Christians decide to backslide, so to speak, on social issues, or when we become dormant and apathetic to society’s problems, then we become inauthentic Christians and we do not act as Christ’s followers.

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Are you being apathetic as a believer to the needs of the needy?

SOCIAL CHRISTIANITY: ITS PROPHETS AND NECESSITY

Christianity seems to have infiltrated every tenant of political ideology in existence. While it is heralded as the harbinger of social revolution by various idealists, the exact understanding of Christianity which is to cause social change has varied broadly across the world. Too often, churches conform to the social and political norms around them, guided by the teachings of Jesus which conform to the confines of the social constructs in one’s immediate area. However, this is not the biblical mandate that demands charity, love, and hope.

Social revolutions and great advancements in terms of equality and social justice have always been the products of the individual soul’s seeking to begin a movement of change. They are the products of idealists who seek the betterment of the human race and who desire to see all men prosper in their own respective ways. The most encompassing title that can be given to such forerunners of social movements is that of a prophet. “These prophetic minds,” says Walter Rauschenbusch, “condense the unconscious longings of the mass of men in concrete experience and thought. They become centers of new light and energy. They awaken and lead the rest because they utter clearly what others feel dimly.”

Prophets are blessed with a divine calling to go out into the world and manifest ideas and convictions of the masses into concise executions. Prophets are social reformers, who enter into the inherent universe and who command both civil and religious leaders get rid of corrupted social practices. Considering these requirements, it cannot be denied there are many who, in reality, are prophets waiting to be recognized as such. A few of such prophets from the preceding centuries are Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, and Martin Luther King Jr., who called for the recognition and abolition of civil injustice and social inequality.

We would not possess a need for prophets and their divine cries for social justice if our society executed a Christian social ethic to begin with. In reality, however, Christianity appears to adapt to the culture around it, with the faith itself varying in practice depending on its geography. In the older European nations, Christianity saw its social implications flourish magnificently through a consistent uprising of prophets; however, most countries still experience a disturbing lack of the Christian message and its relation to social issues across the globe. Rauschenbusch phrases the issue he saw with the contemporary style of Christianity focused on theological confessions and resolutions:

Here is the problem for all religious minds: we need a great faith to serve as a spiritual basis for the tremendous social task before us, and the working creed of our religion, in the form in which it has come down to us, has none. Its theology is silent or stammers where most need a ringing and dogmatic message. It has no adequate answer to the fundamental moral questions of our day. It has manifestly furnished no sufficient religious motives to bring the unregenerate portions of our social order under the control of the Christian law.

 

Rauschenbusch understands that there must exist a powerful and mutually inclusive relationship between theology and action, between preaching and working, between study and charity. Unfortunately, many Christian leaders of denominations and communions are forced into scholasticism or rationalism to defend the Christian faith against the forces of post-Christian culture which the Church finds herself in today. While theology is important enough to have been coined as the queen of all sciences, James’s convicting words remind every theologian that, “Faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead,” (Jam. 2:17b NRSV). Likewise, Paul teaches that “the only thing that counts is faith working through love,” (Gal. 5:6b NRSV).

There is a great value in studying the Holy Bible; additionally, there is an invaluable deposit of the Christian faith which worth studying and contemplating. But the study of one’s faith should not replace one’s practice of it; rather, our practices should assist our faith in the same manner that our faith assists our practices. The study and practice of our faith are ontologically inseparable. Christianity teaches that everything man does, he needs to do with it his eyes facing skyward towards heaven to remind himself of the inherent hope of God. Similarly, the body of Christ teaches that if one is unable to find Christ in the beggar by the church steps, then he or she will be unable to find Christ at the altar. Our Christian faith begins primarily with our relationship with God, but almost immediately thereafter it is molded and defined by our relationship with others. Therefore, the need for social Christianity and its prophets is equally valuable if not connected with the theological aspect of the body of Christ and its renowned theologians throughout the ages.

As a believer,  learn about authentically living a life with Jesus as Lord.  Archbishop Jordan’s book, Prophet in the Marketplace is now available via the Book of the Month Club.

 

Not only does the Book of the Month Club provide a pathway to knowledge, wisdom and insight, it also sets you up to be in attendance at the Spring Session of Prophecology 2018: Birthing House: The Latter Rain, February 23-25, 2018.

 

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What do you think is the role of the prophet in social Christianity?

What must be the Christian Response?

Therefore, what are Christians supposed to do in this society of business, greed, and indifference towards one neighbor? The answer is simple. We are to shine as lights of Christ. We are supposed to be an immoveable city built upon a hill, just as Job. We are to preserve as salt, and are to maintain our saltiness, for “if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people’s feet,” (Matt. 5:13 ESV).

We are to take the call of Jesus, turn off our business partners’ cell phones, log out of social media, take a break from work, and go into the world to care for God’s creations. We are to follow what the Apostle James refers to as the pure and undefiled religion, which teaches caring for the orphans and widows and helps us keep ourselves unstained by the world (James 1:27).

It may be difficult to conquer the passion of greed and covetousness. It is even more difficult to find a sober moment in the business of the globalist society. Nonetheless, the eternal commands of Jesus ring just as clearly today as they did in His own time. “Individual sympathy and understanding,” Walter Rauschenbusch writes, “has been our chief reliance in the past for overcoming the differences between social classes. But if this sympathy diminishes by the widening of the social chasm, what hope have we?” If any good change can happen in the world, that can happen through Christ-like love and compassion for the hungry, poor, and down-trodden by individuals seeking to carry out the messages of the gospel in every way possible.

 

Grow in your knowledge of Jesus and your faith. Start the week right and join us with our LIVE conference call as we discover the Prophet in the Marketplace.  Here are ways to join:

 

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How does sympathy and understanding help you to overcome differences and overlook offense with the people arounds you?

THE FORM OF SOCIAL CIRCLES IN THE EARLY CHURCH

The early Church dispelled any notion of materialism from its midst; it also sought to do away with any form of individualistic wealth that might have brought one’s spiritual walk to a mere crawl. An example of the early Christian form of economics within the ecclesial setting can be seen in the Acts of the Apostles, where,

“…the whole group of those who believed were of one heart and soul, and no one claimed private ownership of any possessions, but everything they owned was held in common… There was not a needy person among them, for as many as owned lands or houses sold them and brought the proceeds of what was sold. They laid it at the apostles’ feet, and it was distributed to each as any had need,”

(Acts 4:32, 34-35).

 

Back then, this practice of possessing all things in common with each other denied any believer to possess great wealth, as the property of all was considered to be commonly owned by the entire Church. If one had food, water, or clothing, he would willingly offer them to the Church. These would then be distributed among the believers, so that “there was not a needy person among them.”

            The socialistic system described above may have originated from the apostles’ understanding of Jesus’ words as recorded in the gospel. Jesus taught that, “No one can serve two masters; for a slave will either hate the one and love the other, or be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and wealth,” (Matt. 6:24 NRSV emphasis added). Furthermore, the actions and work in themselves functioned in a communal way in the early Church, for “the disciples determined that according to their ability, each would send relief to the believers living in Judea,” (Acts 11:29 NRSV emphasis added).

Paul forbade love of money because, according to him, it is “the root of all kinds of evils. On the contrary, some people, who are eager for money, have wandered from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs,” (I Tim. 6:10 ESV). While in the modern consumer-driven culture which many Christians find themselves completely engulfed in makes this reading come across as counter-cultural, one must ask themselves which is more importance: money or salvation?

The early Church understood the latter to be infinitely more valuable than the former; in effect, the Church was entirely willing to share their possessions with their Christian brothers and sisters. But what a far-cry this form of brotherly love is from the modern churches of today! For example, two Christians will sit next to each other in a pew—one would have consumed three meals by noon and dresses himself in the finest clothing, and the other being that he hadn’t eaten in days and were garbed in old, unwashed clothes. In spite of this, they will attend the same church service, listen to the same preacher, sing the same hymns, although the rich man will return to his luxurious home and the poor man to his humble abode.

There is no mutual possession of all things in modern Christian circles; most will actually find any inquiry of their finances inappropriate. Which Christian man, sitting in the pews on a Sunday morning, would be willing to bring all of his belongings (the title to his car, his expensive watch, his cell phone, his food, etc.) to the feet of his pastor, and humbly request that it be distributed among the congregation to meet their needs, or sell what luxurious and unnecessary add-ons to his life in order to see his fellow man be brought up a notch?

This was the spirit of the early Church. The love which each Christian had for another person transcended his or her love and obsession with money and material objects to the point where each was willing to submit to the common ownership of his or her belongings. Such a social theory carries with it a stigma of communism in the modern world, and any suggestion that the early Christian persons practiced this form of anti-materialism might be met with immediate disagreement and defense for one’s lofty possessions.

As a believer,  learn about authentically living a life with Jesus as Lord.  Archbishop Jordan’s book, Prophet in the Marketplace is now available via the Book of the Month Club.

 

Not only does the Book of the Month Club provide a pathway to knowledge, wisdom and insight, it also sets you up to be in attendance at the Spring Session of Prophecology 2018: Birthing House: The Latter Rain, February 23-25, 2018.

 

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How do you exhibit in your own life the spirit of the early church?

The Social Nature of Christianity

The social nature of the Christian church during the apostolic era was seen as a fraternal helpfulness, hence contributing to the wellbeing of the sick and poor. Charity and hearth were often provided for orphans and widows because of poor social conditions prevalent at that time in ancient Rome, during which the divine intrinsic spirit rooted in Judaism making its way into early Hebrew Christianity. By the middle of the third century A.D., the Roman church supported fifteen hundred of such dependents. Likewise, during intense sessions of persecution under the civil or Jewish magistrates, the churches sent comfort to their brothers and sisters as shown in the letter to the Romans commissioned by Ignatius of Antioch during the first century. At this time, Ignatius was begging the church in Rome to not deliver him from his martyrdom. He implied that the Christians during that time would have naturally sought to save those from their common brotherhood.

The church also performed funeral services, its congregants gathering together in an organized fashion to guarantee the participants in the body of Christ a proper burial. “In public calamities, like pestilence or the invasion of nomadic brigands,” Walter Rauschenbusch says, “they stood by their members and sent aid to a distance.” This suggests that Christian hospitality was always guaranteed by the churches. Although those who worked were encouraged to do so in order to contribute to the church, nourishment and provisions were consistently handed to those in need.

This system of social welfare and common-ownership of production was a rather messy operation; it didn’t exist as a systematic establishment until the end of the third century, when one found Christian lodging-houses and homes for the elderly, sick, and poor. While looking after another’s needs during the apostolic and post-apostolic era was largely a direct matter between individuals within specific churches, the practice soon became an organized structure that spread throughout the world.

One witnesses the drawing board precursor to these homes for those in need in the epistles of Paul, who mentions wealthy and influential individuals and families offering their homes for ecclesiastical services and social welfare. Stephanas, Aquila, and Prisca are all examples of this type of contributor which had developed into the hospitable institutions for the low-class as seen by the fourth-century world.

Grow in your knowledge of Jesus and your faith. Start the week right and join us with our LIVE conference call as we discover the Prophet in the Marketplace.  Here are ways to join:

 

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What is your role in serving others? How did the early church did it differently than we did?

BEYOND ECONOMICAL PROBLEMS

Jesus did not deal with sociology political economy, organic chemistry, or American geography—these subjects were out of his range. Instead, he addressed the evil in humanity and the people’s sufferings from a moral perspective, not from an economic or historical point of view.

When someone’s economic needs have been dealt with that he is finally living a comfortable life, is he already free from being haunted by the emptiness of life and the meaninglessness of his existence?  When the question of the distribution of wealth is already addressed for all society, hence making everyone live in comfort (with no sense of urgent anxiety), the question of peace and contentment in the human soul remains.  That people will experience enduring joy and contentment is not certain. The universal equality of wealth does not guarantee universal joy.

If we want to distinguish Jesus’ true intentions, we must study his life in his relation to his own times. The context in which he lived can tell us what Jesus was intentional about.  Jesus was not a timeless religious teacher. His intention was not about having vague conversations about the philosophy of human generalities. He spoke about concrete conditions. He responded to the real-life issues that his generation was facing.

As Christ’s disciples, we must follow his example in the way he coped with the tendencies of his time, his relationship with others, and his repulsion of others. Jesus was compassionate for the lost and the sinners, yet the hypocrisy of the Pharisees and the teachers of the law repulsed him. Nevertheless, Jesus stood for the oppressed and the weak.

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If Jesus did not worry about his economic status, how should you view your own economic situation?

THE SOCIAL IMPETUS OF THE APOSTOLIC JEWISH CHURCH

The Gospel According to the Hebrews was an ancient gospel which roots from early Hebrew Christian circles. Although only a few fragments of the gospel remain, scholars have been able to piece together a version of the story of the rich young ruler. The story revisits the classic Bible story of the rich, young ruler approaching Jesus and asking, “Master what good thing must I do to love?” Jesus replies, “Man, do the law and the prophets.” When the rich young ruler asserts that he has already done so, Jesus tells him, “Go, sell all thou possess and distribute it to the poor and come follow me.” When the rich young ruler, visibly displeased, scratches his head in confusion, Jesus tells him: “How sayest thou, I have done the law and the prophets? For it is written in the law: thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself; and see, many of thy brothers, son of Abraham, are covered with filth, dying of hunger, and thy house is full of much goods, and nothing at all comes out of it.” Judging by this non-canonical gospel that spread in early Hebrew Christian circles, the Hebrew possessed a strong understanding of what it truly meant to love one’s neighbor. In addition, the Hebrew understood Jesus’s incarnation to exposit that to love one’s neighbor was to sacrifice one’s own possessions.

As a believer,  learn about authentically living a life with Jesus as Lord.  Archbishop Jordan’s book, Prophet in the Marketplace is now available via the Book of the Month Club.

Not only does the Book of the Month Club provide a pathway to knowledge, wisdom and insight, it also sets you up to be in attendance at the Spring Session of Prophecology 2018: Birthing House: The Latter Rain, February 23-25, 2018.

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What does it mean for you today to love your neighbor?

THE PARTIALITY OF JESUS

Jesus is just, because the Father is just. However, Jesus took sides when he walked the earth. For example, in Luke 6:20-26, Jesus took the side of the lowly. This account confirms that God and eternity are not on the side of “the rich, the satiated, the devotees of pleasure, the people who take the popular side of everything.”

Ultimately, the verdict will be for those who are poor and underfed, who carry the heavy end of things, and who have to stand for the unpopular side.” In the Beatitudes, the terms are less social, yet more spiritual. The differences between the upper and lower class are not marked. However, there is a promise about a great reversal of things in favor of the humble, the peaceable, and the unpopular. The promise is that they are to inherit the earth and God’s Kingdom.

 

As a believer,  learn about authentically living a life with Jesus as Lord.  Archbishop Jordan’s book, Prophet in the Marketplace is now available via the Book of the Month Club.

Not only does the Book of the Month Club provide a pathway to knowledge, wisdom and insight, it also sets you up to be in attendance at the Spring Session of Prophecology 2018: Birthing House: The Latter Rain, February 23-25, 2018.

Go to and join the club now!

 

How have you been biased or impartial when it comes to the people in your workplace?

LOWLINESS IS ODD IN THE MARKETPLACE

Boasting is the game in the marketplace. People fight for dominance. They want to receive glory and prestige. They want to be the best because they want the recognition that comes with it.

As prophets in the marketplace, we should not to boast of our own status, knowledge or wealth. Instead, we should boast about Jesus Christ. The intention of the prophets in the marketplace is not to receive the glory but to engage with those who are in the marketplace and to give the glory back to God.

It’s natural for the flesh to be lifted with pride. However, in order to correct such pride, we only need to remember that we are also the workmanship of God through grace. Salvation is also obtained by grace, not by our works that we may boast about. Lowliness is an unaffected lowly estimate of the self.

When Christ was on earth, he was also meek and lowly in the heart (Matthew 11:29). In human form, he also absolutely depended on the Father in heaven. Jesus’ example shows that he is truly the pattern of all true creature-dependence. If he can be lowly and he is God and the Messiah, then how much more does lowliness belong to those whom Jesus redeemed from the lowest state of depravity?

When we are dependent upon God for every good, no one can boast about anything, for He is the source from whom all blessings flow. Everything we have is from God. How can we be anything but lowly?

When we check our hearts, we must make sure lowliness is a top virtue in order to live our lives according to the heavenly calling. It is because of this lowliness that we can have significant leverage in the marketplace that is led and controlled by people who have not only lofty social standing but also prideful spirits.

How can the lowly be distinguished from (whom)? They speak of several forms of self-control, each of which prevents them from being proud. Lowliness is about having a humble mind, while meekness can curb pride and cruelty. Patience consists of enduring difficult experiences that they may find themselves in. With lowliness and meekness, individuals are not afraid to suffer. With patience, they learn how to respond if they must suffer.

Grow in your knowledge of Jesus and your faith. Start the week right and join us with our LIVE conference call as we discover the Prophet in the Marketplace.  Here are ways to join:

 

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How are you being pride when it comes to your workplace?

Spotting the Amateur Prophet

Looking around, we will see many amateurs thriving in the marketplace. In contrast, mature prophets are scarce. What separates the amateurs from the mature ones? We see mature people like, Steve Jobs, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Barrack Obama, and ask the question, “What makes them stand out from the rest of the adult population?” They may not be in ministry, but they exhibit the way of being of a mature minister in the way they influence their respective marketplaces.

Usually, amateur prophets merely respond or concede to offers from others. They are easily swayed to compromise (recall the example set by Gehazi). Amateur prophets actually rely on offers from others instead of making offers themselves. Back in the story of Elisha, we see that he was the one offering to the Shunamite woman and Naaman how he could make their lives better. Gehazi took offers that were not even directed to him; in effect, he was stricken with leprosy.

Moreover, amateur prophets tend to wait to respond to offers. They only react to invitations, requests, and offers, and they do so to satisfy immediate needs. If they feel like their happiness or their comfort is threatened, then they react.

Moreover, the level and quality of his contribution to the marketplace and to the world where he belongs is so great that it cannot be compared to that of an amateur prophet.   The Bible shows the state of mind of the mature prophet. The Apostle James tells us, “If any of you is lacking in wisdom, ask God, who gives to all generously and ungrudgingly, and it will be given you” (James 1:5 NRSV). In life, you can always grow. The only question is if you will create for yourself an empty space by which God can generously fill with wisdom.

A mature prophet is someone with a higher sense of drive to fulfill the work entrusted to him. He seeks to achieve a degree of happiness and accomplishment that is beyond his current circumstances. The amateur prophet is also driven by his pursuits of fulfillment of his happiness. Moreover, the level and quality of his contribution to the marketplace and to the world where he belongs is so great that it cannot be compared with that of an amateur prophet.

As a believer,  learn about authentically living a life with Jesus as Lord.  Archbishop Jordan’s book, Prophet in the Marketplace is now available via the Book of the Month Club.

Not only does the Book of the Month Club provide a pathway to knowledge, wisdom and insight, it also sets you up to be in attendance at the Spring Session of Prophecology 2018: Birthing House: The Latter Rain, February 23-25, 2018.

Go to and join the club now!

How do you identify an amateur prophet in your ministry?

MOVING INTO SOCIAL MATURITY

In order to experience social maturity, you must articulate your chief aim in life coherently, logically, and specifically. List your faith goals. Do not just go with the motions of life. Instead, ask God for wisdom for where He wants you to be. Begin by accurately assessing and distinguishing where you are currently in your own life. It may be a painful process to recognize where you are, because it will require you to look into what is missing. Moreover, it will require you to identify areas in your life that lack authenticity and integrity.

Growing in social maturity is a choice you have to make. Times demand making choices, especially on how you are supposed to live your life. Day in and day out you make choices about the unavoidable and inescapable—whether you recognize it or not.  On a similar note, being a prophet in the marketplace is about being highly strategic and purposeful in your choices.

Now, how does an amateur prophet differ from a mature one? An “amateur” prophet differs from a “mature” prophet in the degree by which they pursue the fulfillment of their calling. This pursuit is proven by their ethics, behavior, and the quality, quantity, and value of their invitations, requests, and offers.

Mature prophets seek to transact with other mature ministers. They observe their actions, moods, attitudes, and states of minds to adapt their willingness to make or accept invitations, offers, and requests. They recognize that they have so much more to learn and to grow.

In order to gain access to centers of influence in higher ecologies, one must demonstrate that one can act in similar ways. Therefore, you must have the same level of ethics, ability, capacity, and knowledge in order to fulfill valuable transactions.

The state of mind of the mature prophet is that which allows him to take responsibility and to take care of the needs of others. The mature prophet is not in the marketplace to be served and to be praised; he is there to be a shepherd for the followers of Christ. Mature prophets are distinguished from their amateur counterparts, as  they are able to look beyond their own needs to cover the needs of others, just like adults distinguished from their children. We see that Gehazi and Jonah were amateur prophets because of how they acted and behaved in their ministry. They considered mostly their own needs, hence were unable to cover the needs of others.

Grow in your knowledge of Jesus and your faith. Start the week right and join us with our LIVE conference call as we discover the Prophet in the Marketplace.  Here are ways to join:

1) Call 515-604-9266

2) Go to startmeeting.com, and use the login: BishopJordan

 

How can you grow in your maturity as prophet?

OUR TALENTS IN THE MARKETPLACE

What gives credibility to our message today as marketplace prophets is the value we bring to the industries we are in. We do not need to be in full-time ministry to have a sacred calling. As long as we consecrate our lives and our actions to the Lord, then what we do in our jobs becomes holy.

The Parable of the Buried Talent gives us significant insight into how we must treat God’s gifts to us (Matthew 25:14-30). It tells us that God gives us different gifts. In the parable, one man received five talents, another two, and another one. However, the parable conveys a very clear message about talents. It is not how much talent we have been given that matters to God. Instead, it is how we use it that matters to Him.

God never demands from us abilities which we have not got; but he does demand that we should use to the full the abilities which we do possess. Human beings are not equal in talent; but they can be equal in effort. The parable tells us that whatever talent we have, little or great, we must lay it at the service of God.

As marketplace prophets, how are we supposed to use our talents? Are we even using the talents God has given us? As a universal rule of life, to those who have, more will be given, and those who have not will lose even what they have. If we put to good use our talent, then we are progressively enabling ourselves to do more with it. However, if we use the talents God has given us only within the confines of the local church building, then we limit our reach and influence within the congregation. Conversely, if we look for avenues to glorify God with our talents in the marketplace, then we are able to reach and to influence the marketplace. Hence, the only way to keep a gift is to use it for God’s glory and for serving others.

As a believer,  learn about authentically living a life with Jesus as Lord.  Archbishop Jordan’s book, Prophet in the Marketplace is now available via the Book of the Month Club.

Not only does the Book of the Month Club provide a pathway to knowledge, wisdom and insight, it also sets you up to be in attendance at the Spring Session of Prophecology 2018: Birthing House: The Latter Rain, February 23-25, 2018.

Go to and join the club now!

How are you dedicating your talents for the Lord?